Five principles of visionary leadership

Introduction To many, leaders are not born, but made.

Five principles of visionary leadership

Consider this assertion in terms of his roles as the commander-in-chief of the Continental Army of the Revolution, the president of the Constitutional Convention and the first President of the United States of America.

He received it on the twentieth and he started for Boston on the twenty-first. It is clear that several factors led to his selection: Another factor of great importance, although not stressed or perhaps even acknowledged by many historians and commentators, was that his ideas in regard to British and colonial relations were well known and were representative of ideas shared by the delegates and those whom they represented.

They shared a common vision. First, he must win the war, no matter how long it took. Second, it was a war for independence, liberty. Third, the purpose of this independence from Great Britain was to Five principles of visionary leadership a republican, constitutional government.

Being a republic, its form of government and its ruling officials would all be determined by the people. Washington, more than anyone else in that period, understood the full implication of these ideas in regard to all aspects of his functions as the military leader — strategy, operations, tactics.

I have already shown that Washington had the vision of an independent, republican, constitutional government controlled by a free people. He also envisioned this nation as contributing to the uplifting and happiness in the years, even centuries, to come of the whole world.

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This vision is now being fulfilled as an increasing number of the nations of the world become democracies. As a visionary leader, Washington developed an organization with an organizational culture which achieved the goal of winning the war for independence.

This, as Washington well knew, would be just the first step in the founding of a republican, constitutional government. During the eight years of the American Revolution, General Washington spent far more time, thought and energy as the organizer and administrator of the military forces than he did as a military strategist and tactician.

As a visionary leader, Washington also attracted both military and civilians to follow him to victory. He faced the realities of short term enlistments, desertions, very poorly clad and equipped soldiers, recalcitrant congressional and state legislators and wavering loyalty to the Glorious Cause among the populace.

Yet enough soldiers and civilians so trusted him, believed in him, loved him that they stayed with him and his ideas. Three pivotal episodes illustrate this charismatic appeal. After the Christmas day battle at Trenton after the crossing of the Delaware, many of the soldiers were ready to leave because their enlistments were up.

Washington urgently appealed to them to step forward and stay with him in this noble cause. Hesitantly at first, but then almost completely, the soldiers stepped forward because of their trust in and regard for Washington.

In that moment, he saved the army and the revolutionary cause. The battle at Monmouth, New Jersey in also revealed his charismatic leadership and his genius as a battlefield tactician. There was a conspiratorial movement among many officers because they had not been paid and recognized adequately for their years of sacrifice.

Washington appealed to their reason but it was probably due as much to their emotional ties to him that, after his dramatic meeting with them, they affirmed their loyalty to the Cause and dropped all conspiratorial intentions.

Washington biographer James Thomas Flexner wrote: Washington excelled in all three roles of a visionary leader; he excelled equally in maintaining coherence between his long term goals and specific, current actions.

We see this time and time again in his unfaltering commitment to the idea that in a republic the military must always be subject to civilian control.Management Skills and Roles Figure suggests the relationships of technical, conceptual, and human relations skills and shows their typical weighting at various levels.

Specific situations require greater or lesser. This study was motivated by the premise that no nation grows further than the quality of its educational leaders. The purpose of this theoretical debate is to examine the wider context of leadership and its effectiveness towards improving school management.

This academic evaluation examines recent theoretical developments in the study of educational leadership . • The leader role is affected by how well the roles of de- signer and strategist are performed. The leader role is more difficult because of the dynamism of the health .

Five principles of visionary leadership

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District Takes Steps to Improve Staff Wellness While programs to improve student wellness have been in schools for years, some districts now are focusing on staff health as well. Leadership is both a research area and a practical skill encompassing the ability of an individual or organization to "lead" or guide other individuals, teams, or entire organizations.

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